Unit 06 (3ESO) Structure and Design

STRUCTURE AND DESIGN

UNIT 6 DAY 1 - Writing Songs.

   

Questionnaire (Unit 6 Day 1 - Twenty First Lecture of 3ESO)

What can a composer do with a musical melody to continue it?
    Repeat it, vary it or contrast it with another one.


Creating music can be compared to working with bricks of a building game. With the knowledge we have of harmony, this construction can produce songs. 

There are three possible developments from one melody that are repetition, variation and contrast, as we studied last year. 



A single Musical piece can have examples of these three types of composition. Even within one part we may have repetitions, variations and contrasts affecting different elements of Music and everyone of them at the same time.

Why we love repetition in music - Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis


   

Hanon Aloud - Exercise 41 (Day 1)
Fifths in descending order


C - F / B - E / A - D / G - C / F - B / E - A / D - G



Recorder 2ESO



UNIT 6 DAY 2 - Rondo and Passacaglia.

   

Questionnaire (Unit 6 Day 2 - Twenty Second Lecture of 3ESO)

 The Rondo.
    It is a kind of composition in which different episodes are oposed to a main part returning invariably to it.

 The Passacaglia.
    It is another kind of Music written keeping an immovable accompaniment or bass, and writing melodic variations over it.

To compose a Rondo it can be defined a symmetrical basic form with the structure A, B, A, C, A, B, A. In part A we will have our melody and in parts B and C we will write other new and different melodies. 


Music Appreciation - The Rondo


Without leaving Part A we can create a Passacaglia, playing the same chord progression and then adding variations to the melody, keeping an immovable accompaniment or bass and writing melodic variations.

Händel Passacaglia in g-minor (Harpsichord)


   

Hanon Aloud - Exercise 41 (Day 2)
Fifths in descending order


C - F / B - E / A - D / G - C / F - B / E - A / D - G


Recorder 2ESO



UNIT 6 DAY 3 - Parts of a Song.

   

Questionnaire (Unit 6 Day 3 - Twenty Third Lecture of 3ESO)

Elements of a Song.
    Main melodies, introductions and endings or codas; bridges and recaps.

 Common names of the parts of a popular song..
    Verses and chorus, introduction, bridge and coda.
    

A piece of Music not only consists of main parts. Everywhere it includes modifications of the accompaniment or the main melody to provide variety and to indicate a change of part. 

Other elements of a musical composition, aside from the main melodies are introductions and endings or codas; bridges and recaps


The most important part of a popular song is the chorus and the verse melody is the secondary idea. We add an introduction, a bridge and a coda, repeating the verse-chorus structure three times, with a bridge between the second and third repetitions. 


HELP! What is a VERSE, CHORUS, & BRIDGE?


   

Hanon Aloud - Exercise 42 (Day 1)
Ascending Sixths. 


C - A / D - B / E - C / F - D / G - E / A - F / B - G


Recorder 2ESO



UNIT 6 DAY 4 - Structure and Style. 

   

Questionnaire (Unit 6 Day 4 - Twenty Fourth Lecture of 3ESO)

Number of bars a Melody usually has.
    A number that is a multiple of four or six.

  What is a musical 'cell'?
    It is an easily recognizable musical motif that characterizes any passage and serves as a central idea from which depart when composing.


To compose a song you just have to write two parts, for example, of sixteen bars each and sketch from them the introduction, the bridge and the coda. 

Each group of sixteen bars can be divided into four smaller parts of four measures. A melody would be written in a number of bars that is a multiple of four or six.


Once we have the basic harmonic progression we can proceed to the creation of the melody from a 'cell' adapted to that chord progression, rewriting everything that does not work, especially the alterations

The songwriters accompanied themselves by an instrument that can make chords while singing the melody with its lyrics. 


A musical 'cell' is an easily recognizable musical motif that characterizes any passage and serves as a central idea from which ro start when writing. 

Once we have the sketch of the song with the melody and chord accompaniment we must realize in which style the song will be performed. 

We will apply the rules of accompaniment in that style, giving it a finished form and an orchestration within that style.

Songwriting 101: How to write/record a "Better" song!


   

Hanon Aloud - Exercise 42 (Day 2)
Ascending Sixths. 


C - A / D - B / E - C / F - D / G - E / A - F / B - G

Recorder 2ESO





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          This unit we have learnt...
(Unit 1)


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