Unit 12 (3ESO) What do you mean when you say 'Music'?

WHAT DO YOU MEAN WHEN YOU SAY 'MUSIC'?

UNIT 12 DAY 1 - Universal Language?

   

Questionnaire (Unit 12 Day 1 - Forty-Fifth Lecture of 3ESO)

Why Music is not really a language?
    Because it is a way to communicate through the art of creating something with sound, not a way to communicate concrete ideas.

 Why we can not have a impartial definition of Music if musical works are always the same?
    Because there is no unified vision of what is Music.

Even when it says Music is a universal language, music is not a language the way we use the concept of 'language' and can hardly be 'universal' if every country in the World has a Music that it is produce and sounds in such different ways, has different uses and is understood in the most varied ways. 

Alphabetical 26-Genre Song

26 Genres of Music in Alphabetical Order #2 (A2Z)


There is not even a unitary vision of 'Music' through history.

Differences Between The Music Genres


   

Hanon Aloud - Exercise 53 (Day 1)
Notes of the C Major arpegio followed by other three descending notes.


C – E – C – D - C - B / E - G - E - F - E - D / G - B - G - A - G - F / B - D - B - C - B - A



Recorder 2ESO



UNIT 12 DAY 2 - Try to define the problem.

   

Questionnaire (Unit 12 Day 2 - Forty-Sixth Lecture of 3ESO)

 Historical evolution of the term 'Music'.
    The Greek philosophers wrote abount its suitability for the education of citizens and to what extent could we afford that it would affect people's moods. This vision remained with slight variations until the Eighteenth Century when the musician is emancipated from its status as servant and attains the status of the artist. Creating moods was the only thing that could be used tocompose a piece of Music. Today we have a more open view.


The definitions of what is Music - at least what the word 'Music' means - have evolved throughout History. The social function of Music marks the first attempts to explain it. 

For the Greek philosophers it was important to society, and the artistic part was secondary. Music was a way to link people and transmit emotions not really a kind of art in itself, at least not an abstract one. But the pitagoeran disagree with that. Music is number to them. 

Music and creativity in Ancient Greece - Tim Hansen


From the Eighteenth Century,  Music was considered the most important of the arts, but only if it was pleasant or excites our moods. 

Fortunately Music is no longer considered like that and, as a philosopher of music named Rowell said, 'let Music mean anything from what we normally mean by that word.'

   

Hanon Aloud - Exercise 53 (Day 2)
Notes of the C Major arpegio followed by other three descending notes.


C – E – C – D - C - B / E - G - E - F - E - D / G - B - G - A - G - F / B - D - B - C - B - A


Recorder 2ESO



UNIT 12 DAY 3 - Music Aesthetics in the Last two Centuries: the Nineteenth Century.

   

Questionnaire (Unit 12 Day 3 - Forty-Seventh Lecture of 3ESO)

What is the most important change in the social status of the musician in the Nineteenth Century?
    The change of status from Craftsman (or artisan) to Artist.

 Why Music change its position in the rank or the Arts in that Century?.
    Because the philosofers, aesthetes and the other artist reconsider Music as a very important Art, instead of plain entertainment.
    

In the last Unit (Unit 11, Music of the Classical Period) we saw how the musician changed his social status from craftsman to artist. This progression was noted in the review of what we mean by 'Music'. 

Philosophy and Aesthetics return their interest in the concept 'Music' as it was done in Classical Greece and giving back to Music its artistic and meaningful content. 

At mid-nineteenth Century, Music has a predominant role in the world of the Arts. Authors like Schumann, Brahms, Wagner or Liszt have clear aesthetic ideas of what should be the Art of Music and at the end of the century other authors endow their compositions of mysticism and symbolism.

Schumann - Traumerei

Brahms: Ein Deutsches Requiem

Wagner - "Tristan und Isolde", Prelude

Liszt Transcendental Etudes - No.12 'Chasse-Neige'

Simbolism or Impresionism - Claude Debussy - La Mer

Mysticism - Scriabin - Poeme of Ecstasy


   

Hanon Aloud - Exercise 54 (Day 1)
Pairs of tetrad chords starting in the same note and changing from ascending to descending 



C - E - G - B / C - A - F - D / E - G - B - D / E - C - A - F / G - B - D - F / G - E - C - A / B - D - F - A / B - G - E - C


Recorder 2ESO



UNIT 12 DAY 4 - Music Aesthetics in the last two Centuries: The Twentieth Century. 

   

Questionnaire (Unit 12 Day 4 - Forty-Eighth Lecture of 3ESO)

What changed in the concept of 'Music' during the Twentieth Century?
    The Art Vanguards and the Popular Music opened the limits to what could be considered Music and now it is even wider than it was in the previous centuries.


With the Twentieth century vanguards arrive and with them everything changes, including the plausible concepts of Music. On one hand, it adapts to modern, urban life, with its popular music and its technology. On the other, it breaks from the past or goes forward to the limit of all previous proposals. 

Leaving Home - Orchestral Music in the 20th Century


Music made of what in another era would be noise; Music made of silence; Music that records sounds collected from our environment and transforms them into musical compositions; Music and theater as one. 

Cage Music Circus

Stockhausen "Helicopter String Quartet"

Reich - Different Trains (Europe - During the war)

BORIS with MERZBOW - "Huge"


There is no limit for Music beyond that what we want to give it to it.

   

Hanon Aloud - Exercise 54 (Day 2)
Pairs of tetrad chords starting in the same note and changing from ascending to descending 



C - E - G - B / C - A - F - D / E - G - B - D / E - C - A - F / G - B - D - F / G - E - C - A / B - D - F - A / B - G - E - C

Recorder 2ESO





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